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<  The Path - discussion  ~  'The Horror' in The Path?

mondehre
Posted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 9:06 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 22 Mar 2009 Posts: 3
[/quote]Oh, and by the way: To you it might be just some average teenage drama. But you could as well try to imagine what life was like if you were the one ending up as the tragic hero.[/quote]

Average teenage drama ... hell, no! I didnt want to be oversimplistic like that!

But maybe there is something in it. Because when looking back in my life to extra-horrible times, I would definitely locate them in those teenage-years, when the "Forest within" was extra-dense! As the devs said, it's a game of growing up. But I think that when you grow older, the "forest within" becomes more and more civilized. You get to know your personal wolves and know how to deal with them ... or better: how to avoid them. But in those teenage years, you are absolutely overwhelmed by the wilderness within yourself. Maybe because of that I may have sounded as if I would see it like a - as you call it - "teenage-drama". Well, it was horror!

For me the game doesnt cover the aspect that growing up has also its good sides, and because of that I call it pessimistic and tragic. There is no resolution, no chance - the girls will get spoiled, whatever they do.

"You can do nothing but press forward and, in the end, die." - Yeah! Its definitely this which I find horrifying!
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Emriss
Posted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 9:12 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 23 Sep 2007 Posts: 612
The one run that's freaked me out the most (so far) is Ruby. Because I fail at self-restraint, I had an idea of what her Wolf was, what happened when she met said Wolf, etc. As we explored the forest and her thoughts, I started to feel sad for her. Here she is, swamped in her atleast partially self-imposed depression. Why impose so much more sorrow on her, even if she thought that's what she wanted? I didn't want her to die, to be [SPOILERS] pulled into that world of smoking, the 'wrong crowd', probably also drugs. I rushed her to the GiW, disparing as all Ruby did was laugh at her. She ignored that voice in her head that would lead her back to safety, but I kept pushing her, until finally she gave in, took the GiWs hand, and returned to the path. They embraced, then they walked hand-in-hand up to the wood walkway to GMs house. One more hug, then the GiW left. Ruby made a gesture that, before, had seemed like an idle rubbing of her nose, but now seemed more like brushing away a tear.[/SPOILERS]


For me, that's the horror. I wasn't quite Ruby, but I did feel like her guardian angel, a guiding force. Her almost reaching the point of no return (i.e: her Wolf), then finally getting back on the right path, sent me on an emotional rollercoaster. It only had a few dips, but that was enough to put me off the game for the rest of the evening. I applaud ToT for making me feel almost maternal toward a prettily rendered mass of pixels.
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Mr. Underhill
Posted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 10:33 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 01 Apr 2009 Posts: 18
mondehre wrote:
[
But maybe there is something in it. Because when looking back in my life to extra-horrible times, I would definitely locate them in those teenage-years, when the "Forest within" was extra-dense! As the devs said, it's a game of growing up. But I think that when you grow older, the "forest within" becomes more and more civilized. You get to know your personal wolves and know how to deal with them ... or better: how to avoid them.

I don't know many people who found a way to deal with their personal wolves when they grew older.
Most of them just found a way to stick to the path, what ever that might mean.
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MacHenry
Posted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 7:50 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 08 Aug 2009 Posts: 3
(Advance apologies for reviving a zombie topic.)

To me, this is classic suspense, more than modern horror. I'm reminded of Alfred Hitchcock's films that just unsettle you more than scare you. Or, as Ursula Vernon put it (whose blog directed me here, by the by): It's like being a woman and walking along the wrong side of town at night. You have that feeling of menace coming from every corner... that you could be robbed or worse.

As a male, I don't often get that feeling, but this game seems just like that. Leading poor Robin around a creepy, ruined playground is the essence of that feeling -- that something horrible could happen at any second (even though "veteran" players know that you have to initiate the wolf encounter).
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Xanadu
Posted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 10:50 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 28 Mar 2009 Posts: 45
I never really considered, "The Path" to be horror so much as it was spooky and surreal. I'm not sure I could really even distinguish the difference, though. Mostly, the game inspired in me what I might call, "Curiosity with a sense of menace". However, there was one part that honestly scared me, and that was Robin.




Spoilers ahead...



When she was playing in the fresh grave, musing on the idea of death, I caught a glimpse of the wolf stalking around her, and that was just...unsettling. To see this little girl with almost no concept of death or dying, with this monster, easily capable of killing her at a moments notice behind her. The wolf built up a lot of tension by just being there. Then, I eventually went to interact with the wolf, and I try to figure out what on earth would happen. When she jumped on its back so suddenly, it scared me to death. I kept thinking that the wolf was going to attack her for just being in the graveyard, seeing her push the wolf like that was just way to dangerous. That spooked me, while the rest of the girls wolves made be think about unsettling things. But then again, Robin is the youngest and most immature of the girls, so it makes sense that her wolf would teach a lesson so primordial and basic, while the other girls wolves require a bit more subtlety.
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Alex H
Posted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 12:47 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 Jul 2009 Posts: 47 Location: Baltimore, MD, USA
Xanadu wrote:
I never really considered, "The Path" to be horror so much as it was spooky and surreal. I'm not sure I could really even distinguish the difference, though. Mostly, the game inspired in me what I might call, "Curiosity with a sense of menace". However, there was one part that honestly scared me, and that was Robin.




Spoilers ahead...



When she was playing in the fresh grave, musing on the idea of death, I caught a glimpse of the wolf stalking around her, and that was just...unsettling. To see this little girl with almost no concept of death or dying, with this monster, easily capable of killing her at a moments notice behind her. The wolf built up a lot of tension by just being there. Then, I eventually went to interact with the wolf, and I try to figure out what on earth would happen. When she jumped on its back so suddenly, it scared me to death. I kept thinking that the wolf was going to attack her for just being in the graveyard, seeing her push the wolf like that was just way to dangerous. That spooked me, while the rest of the girls wolves made be think about unsettling things. But then again, Robin is the youngest and most immature of the girls, so it makes sense that her wolf would teach a lesson so primordial and basic, while the other girls wolves require a bit more subtlety.


That was the single terrifying experience for me. Robin was my first girl, so I had no idea what to expect from a wolf. As I stumbled upon the graveyard, I saw the wolf climbing the hill in the cutscene, and I hesitated.
It also tainted every other wolf encounter for me. I played Rose next, and I avoided the boat as frequently as I could. I was almost disappointed in a way that her wolf was not frightening like the werewolf was. The game wouldn't have been the same if I hadn't played as Robin first.

It might have also been because I had this strange dream as a kid with a wolf. I was either in my house's living room or kitchen. In the kitchen, there were some weird, cruel people in there that made fun of me. In the living room, the hallway was replaced with a cave with a wolf inside staring at me, licking his lips. The strange with was, I kept having the dream until I gathered the courage to approach the wolf, resulting in being devoured. Crazy parallels there, huh?
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SkardJR
Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:22 am Reply with quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2009 Posts: 10 Location: Somewhere in the COLLECTIVE SUBCONSCIOUS.
I have played a lot of horror games, such as Silent Hill, Dead Space, FEAR and FEAR 2, and of course this game, The Path.

Of the ones I mentioned, and as everyone just seem to agree upon, Silent Hill is the closest in comparison to The Path.

Both games have an amazing ability to draw you in, make you feel helpless, and start panicking and possibly just freak out altogether. Some of the most scariest scenes in Silent Hill didn't have monsters in em. It was the more psychologically disturbing scenes that got me.

The Path, for me, freaked me out when I figured out that you can't go back to the path on your own, that you will be forever lost in the forest once you step into it far enough. That personally made me freak out. But going through Grandmother's House after a wolf encounter also gave me the creeps. I seriously felt like my mind was going to crack and that I'd think of nothing but that for the rest of my life ^^;

I'm surprised no one mentioned DEAD SPACE. DEAD SPACE has similarities in the "boo!" kind of horror with FEAR and DOOM, but it also works hard to immerse you into the story like Silent Hill.

But I digress, the similarities end there. Some of the greatest horror games in existence have the most unique way of going about things... The Path is one of em Razz
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Fahnette
Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 3:45 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 15 May 2009 Posts: 130 Location: In Newly-Wedded Bliss
Ah, Dead Space. Poor Isaac. I was waiting for him to tell Daniels to shut the hell up, get her whiny over-dramatic behind onto the Ishimura, and help him for once.
If something breaks in our house, my husband and I have a little habit of yelling "ISAAC! Come and fix this!"

How to describe the horror in The Path... a few years ago I went to a haunted house for Halloween. It had the typical booga-booga stuff, but there was one room that was a maze. And it was pitch black. Creepy enough, yet the house designers went one further and set people INSIDE the maze walls to scratch and tap at the walls, moaning in pain as the helpless victims blindly fumbled through the darkness. It lasted 15 minutes and it messed with your head.

After that room I was glad to see Jumpy Chainsaw Guy.
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SkardJR
Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 3:48 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2009 Posts: 10 Location: Somewhere in the COLLECTIVE SUBCONSCIOUS.
Fahnette wrote:


How to describe the horror in The Path... a few years ago I went to a haunted house for Halloween. It had the typical booga-booga stuff, but there was one room that was a maze. And it was pitch black. Creepy enough, yet the house designers went one further and set people INSIDE the maze walls to scratch and tap at the walls, moaning in pain as the helpless victims blindly fumbled through the darkness. It lasted 15 minutes and it messed with your head.

After that room I was glad to see Jumpy Chainsaw Guy.


I loved that example. Yes, that's exactly how it feels Razz
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JackandBlood
Posted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:59 am Reply with quote
Joined: 19 Aug 2009 Posts: 51
Im pretty sure the horror is sorely from the masculine point view Evil or Very Mad I mean, how do we deal with evil in other games? We put one in the stomach and two in the head.
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JackandBlood
Posted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:59 am Reply with quote
Joined: 19 Aug 2009 Posts: 51
Im pretty sure the horror is souly from the masculine point view Evil or Very Mad I mean, how do we deal with evil in other games? We put one in the stomach and two in the head.
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JackandBlood
Posted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:07 am Reply with quote
Joined: 19 Aug 2009 Posts: 51
I dont know how well your motor reflexes are, but Fear 1 (Not two, one). can mess with you. The FEAR team did an excellent job with pacing, lighting, and images. I'm assuming you're female. This game scares a bit, but in a different way. Males tend to not tread this bit of territory, tend to avoid it, the game applies it head on.
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SkardJR
Posted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 11:58 am Reply with quote
Joined: 16 Aug 2009 Posts: 10 Location: Somewhere in the COLLECTIVE SUBCONSCIOUS.
JackandBlood wrote:
I dont know how well your motor reflexes are, but Fear 1 (Not two, one). can mess with you. The FEAR team did an excellent job with pacing, lighting, and images. I'm assuming you're female. This game scares a bit, but in a different way. Males tend to not tread this bit of territory, tend to avoid it, the game applies it head on.


That's a common assumption, to think that males tend not to go through this kind of territory Smile

My motor reflexes are fine hahahaha. I'm male. And I delve into this kind of territory all the time. And before you assume that I'm gay, I'm not, thank you Smile

I have to agree, FEAR did an amazing job, but it still relies mainly on the "boo" type of horror. Silent Hill and THE PATH are rather different as they focus on the psychological side of things and not for the more apparent horrors commonly found in old ghost stories and haunted houses. Razz
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Fahnette
Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:56 am Reply with quote
Joined: 15 May 2009 Posts: 130 Location: In Newly-Wedded Bliss
Skard makes a very important point. The things that scare us the most cannot always be driven away with guns and swords and bombs. That's the purpose of this game, to stir from sleep the little things that make our skin crawl and our hearts skip a beat.

When I saw "Silence Of The Lambs" there was one scene that I saw over and over when I closed my eyes at night because it chilled me to the bone. For a WEEK. It was the first time you see Hannibal Lecter when's standing in his cell, so still, so steady. SO cold.

And yes, it's all relative. What keeps one person from going into a dark basement encourages another to grab a flashlight and explore. But no amount of machismo and firepower can prepare you to go into the darkest place there is... the human mind. That is where the Path asks you to go.
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Alex H
Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 6:34 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 Jul 2009 Posts: 47 Location: Baltimore, MD, USA
The most frightening things are those that you can't control, not those that you can.
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