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<  News & gossip  ~  The 10 Minutes Game Sales Potential Test

Michael
Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 12:41 am Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
Interesting article on Gamasutra, claiming that the answers to the following questions are sufficient to know whether a game design idea is suitable to pursue for commercial development.

Quote:
1. Is the Game Distinctive?
1.1. Does it stand out viscerally?
1.2. Does the gameplay stand out?
1.3. Does it involve the player socially in a unique way?
2. Can the Game Reach a Large Market?
2.1. Is the idea behind the game easy to communicate?
2.2 Is the game based on something the market already knows and loves?
2.3 Is the target market large?
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Michael
Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 12:46 am Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
The topic of "standing out" is interesting because standing out is only possible if there is a context. If your game is totally unique, logically it cannot stand out because there will be nothing to put it next to. So to some extent, the trick could simply be the find the right context. If you make a World War II FPS game, market it as a pet-care game or a basketball game, et voilà: instant standing out. Smile
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Michael
Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 12:52 am Reply with quote
Site Administrator Joined: 07 Jun 2002 Posts: 8065 Location: Gent, Belgium
And this is a good point:
Quote:
No matter how good your game idea is, if you can’t communicate what makes it good in a simple and compelling way, it won’t become a success.


This is one of the problems that we have with The Endless Forest and also with 144. And we also had it with 8. We often focus on what the games are lacking to attract attention, like there being no chat, no violence, no goals, no missions, no competition, no scores, etcetera. But while that may work for the rebellious players who are interested in experiments and odd things, it actually discredits the games to a large extent because everybody who has played them realizes that there is a lot more to it than that. In fact that all those things are missing is only the logical result of much deeper design decisions. But we haven't been able to communicate this at all.
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Teign
Posted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 7:06 am Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Jan 2007 Posts: 25
We've been having the same frustration with Talesia; at first, it was because I wasn't sure what we were trying to create... now that I know, expressing it in a simple sentence or two is the hurdle.

Watching the conversation develop in the Princess Mono. thread has been fascinating - TEF players have a wonderful way with words (fascinating since the game doesn't have any!). In my opinion, The Endless Forest's appeal lies in the immersiveness of its little world, which lends it a peculiar emotional impact. Is this the heart of TEF's design, the thing you cut away all that extraeneous gamism to expose?

For me, I guess the emotion is almost wistful: like a memory from childhood, innocent, playful, full of wonder and potential magic.

Maybe the problem is, you hit your goal - TEF is art, and defining an artistic work is always difficult...

The Endless Forest, your non-game-game, is touching too much Zen to easily pin down... Wink
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